what we do

01

WATER, SANITATION & HYGIENE

Most illnesses and deaths in the areas where OCDU operates are caused by eating and/or drinking contaminated food and water.  Many of these diseases caused by pathogenic organisms can easily be prevented. OCDU takes action on this problem through a number of programmes.

Encourage boiling water for drinking, properly covering water containers, keeping water and food containers safe from germs e.g. use of racks and avoiding eating cold and half cooked food.

Emphasizing protecting water quality from source to point of use (e.g. ensuring latrines are not too close to water points, cleanliness of water points, fencing for protection particularly against animals and safe drainage,  cleanliness of storage vessels, pouring not dipping to avoid contaminating stored water, if dipping, two utensils should be used one for drawing and another for drinking)

Hand washing with soap is emphasized at household level to ensure that people are taught the advantages of washing hands with soap after critical moments like after using a latrine, before feeding a baby, before preparing food, after washing babies’ bottom etc.

 When both hand washing and using hand sanitizer are not available, hands can be cleaned with uncontaminated ash and clean water, although the benefits and harms are uncertain for reducing the spread of viral or bacterial infections.

Encourage boiling water for drinking, properly covering water containers, keeping water and food containers safe from germs e.g. use of racks and avoiding eating cold and half cooked food.

Emphasizing protecting water quality from source to point of use (e.g. ensuring latrines are not too close to water points, cleanliness of water points, fencing for protection particularly against animals and safe drainage,  cleanliness of storage vessels, pouring not dipping to avoid contaminating stored water, if dipping, two utensils should be used one for drawing and another for drinking)

Other sanitation and hygiene points emphasized include: proper toilet use by all, toilets should have lids and draining away of stagnant water, personal hygiene is also encouraged among the vulnerable groups including people Living with HIV/Aids.

Slashing/ clearing bushes around their homes to reduce the risked of poisonous snakes and clear off bleeding places of mosquitoes.

02

Child Sponsorship

With partnerships with friends and families, OCDU supports orphans and other vulnerable children to attain formal education through provision of school fees and scholastic materials.  Materials provided include: Soap for washing their clothes and uniforms, books, pens, pencils, and uniforms.

03

Food Security & Nutrition + Micro-Economic Activities

In the struggle to pull the people we serve from poverty, OCDU encourages her beneficiaries to make crafts into products such Baskets, caps etc from local materials. The handmade crafts can be sold and earn some money for household basic requirements such as soap, salt, paraffin, and sugar, beneficiaries are the most vulnerable groups including people Living with HIV/Aids

As Agriculture is the backbone of Uganda's economy, employing 70% of the population, and contributing half of Uganda's export earnings and a quarter of the country's gross domestic product (GDP)

76% of the population we serve depend on subsistence agriculture, OCDU has developed programmes to support rural farmers in modern agricultural practices through training the farmers in modern organic farming, skills were passed on to us by an Australian friend  in order to produce enough food for household consumption and selling the surplus.

Supplement programs for newborns and their mothers: Even with an adequate food supply, pregnant and nursing mothers and their young children have unique nutritional needs. They need more protein, folate, calcium, and iron, as well as more calories.

In addition we will educate the communities on proper diet balancing in order to reduce malnutrition levels and deaths in children and people living with HIV/Aids.

OCDU will teach and implement sustainable farming techniques: Farming techniques such as agro forestry, organic agriculture, and perm culture are more sustainable and practical on a small, rural scale. Poor farmers need to learn about these techniques and have access to the resources they need in order to implement them.

OCDU will also teach how to build and maintain soil productivity: Healthy soil is the foundation of a healthy farm and leads to increased crop yields. Rebuilding soil after intensive cultivation is necessary to maintain soil productivity. Essential soil nutrients can be replenished through techniques such as fertilization, composting, inter-planting, and crop and field rotation.

 Sustainable water access: A consistent water source is necessary for growing crops and for human survival. Rainwater harvesting systems and wells can provide water to a community, while drip irrigation systems give farmers access to water for their crops.

Increase sustainable crop production: Increasing crop yields is important to improving food security and fighting undernourishment. Farmers need access to high-quality seeds of appropriate crops, as well as information about planting, growing, harvesting, and crop management.

Economic organization: Farmers need a way to connect with customers in nearby communities in order to sell their products. Additionally, small-scale farmers can benefit from farmer cooperatives, wherein all the farmers in a community combine their resources in order to receive a better price for their crops. Aid organizations need to invest in the infrastructure and education necessary to create viable economic systems for farmers.

Improve food security: This means making sure that everyone in the community, including farmers, consistently have adequate calories and nutrition. Food security can be improved in many ways, including building food storage facilities, providing access to fuel-efficient cook stoves, and sourcing food locally, just to name a few.

04

Micro Loans Programme & Vocational Training

This project empowers individuals in Uganda through vocational training such as tailoring/catering and computer/information technology to enable marketability and success in a challenging economy. Microfinance loans are provided primarily to young adults and women to effectively start and grow their small businesses. Small businesses are the life-blood of African economies and this is an excellent way to bring change in communities.

Challenge

The International Labour Organization (ILO) reported in 2018, "The prevalence of working poverty in Africa is still so significant that the African working poor represented more than half (56%) of the world's working poor in 2018, while African employment represented only 14 percent of global employment." Many young adults are unable to gain the expertise that will enable them to become self-sufficient. These youths are caught in a vicious cycle of powerlessness and poverty.

Solution

This programme will address the problem of  skills deficit by providing crucial training in marketable skills to those in need. Skills are vital for poverty reduction, economic recovery, and sustainable development. When possible, trainees are provided with a toolkit to help them start their own businesses increasing their chance of financial success. They also have the opportunity to receive a microfinance loan to start or expand their businesses, become self-reliant, and employ others.

Long-Term Impact

Technical and vocational training contributes to youth development by providing skills for self-reliance and entrepreneurship. This effective intervention combats poverty and increases the strength of local economies further uplifting the people of Uganda. Individuals and small businesses are able to become self-sufficient; bringing one family at a time out of the cycle of poverty. As businesses become empowered, this contributes to a drop in overall poverty creating a stronger society.

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